Hot Weather Remote Start FAQs

Summer 2017 is shaping up to be one of the hottest North American summers in history, and there’s nothing worse on a summer than a burning-hot vehicle to drive in. Compustar remote starters are the perfect solution for cooling down your vehicle before you hit the road so that you and your passengers can ride in comfort and safety.

The Compustar Marketing Team (CM) sat down with one of Compustar’s technical support agents, Josh W. (JW, MECP), who answered some common questions regarding remote starters in hotter climates.

CM: How do Compustar remote starters work in hot weather?
JW: Just like you would remote start your vehicle’s engine to turn on the heater during winter, you can also remote start your vehicle to turn on the A/C system to cool down your vehicle. To do this, turn on your A/C and set your temperature on your vehicle’s dashboard before leaving your vehicle. When you remote start, your A/C will automatically activate at the preset temperature.

CM: Can a vehicle’s A/C cool down the vehicle, even when it is not moving?
JW: Yes! A vehicle’s air conditioning unit can cool down the vehicle, even when idling. The vehicle does not need to be moving or at high RPMs for the condenser to charge the air conditioning. Once the engine operating temperature is reached, the cooling fan(s) attached to the radiator will start up to keep the engine from overheating provided the vehicle’s cooling system is within proper operating parameters.

Note: older vehicles may take a little longer to cool down when idling. But remote starting the vehicle also circulates the air and alleviates some of the pressure that causes the intense heat inside of a vehicle. So regardless of your vehicle’s age, your car will be much more comfortable to drive in if you start it at least 5 minutes before hitting the road.

CM: Is it safe to remote start a vehicle in hot weather?
JW: It is generally safe to remote start your vehicle in hot weather. We recommend remote starting the vehicle while it is in open air, in a well-ventilated area and not in a garage or enclosed space. In extreme heat, you will want to make sure that your vehicle’s cooling system is functioning properly before using the remote start feature to avoid overheating the engine.

Most automotive manufacturers recommend that you have your engine coolant flushed and refilled every 30,000 miles or 5 years. Mechanics will usually test other parts of your cooling system at the same time, including the thermostat and hoses; to make sure they are within operating parameters.

CM: Can I customize my Compustar remote starter too, for example, lower my windows or open my sunroof?
JW: If your vehicle is equipped with power windows and/or sunroof, your installer can connect those features to your Compustar remote start system so that you can activate them using your Compustar remote or the DroneMobile app. Your installer can also add a temperature sensor to your vehicle so that remote start functionality is automated. Make sure to ask your installer/dealer about climate control and customization options ahead of time and they can go over your options with you before beginning the installation of our system.

We hope that Josh’s answers provided some additional insight for you as you consider a Compustar remote starter for your vehicle. Contact your local authorized Compustar retailer today to request pricing, options, and more info for adding a remote start to your vehicle.

Important Note: Compustar remote starters do NOT make it safe to leave a child or pet unattended inside of a hot vehicle! Please use your Compustar remote start system to cool down your vehicle before you and your passengers re-enter your vehicle.

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OESA President Cites Warranty Collaboration as Industry Imperative

Neil De Koker, president of the Original Equipment Suppliers Association, OESA, recently called for automotive industry executives to work together to focus on reducing industry warranty costs. In a brief address to attendees of the Management Briefing Seminars, De Koker said that OESA has created a Warranty Management Council, responsible for developing recommendations to reduce warranty costs.

According to Warranty Week, the industry spent $11.5 billion on warranty claims in 2004. OESA proposes that it is the responsibility of both suppliers and car companies to seriously look at warranty and other non-value added costs.

"We heard from speakers today who tell us that the next two years will require significant and extreme action to maintain profitability," De Koker stated. "It is imperative that members of the industry collaborate to reduce warranty costs to keep companies competitive.

"OESA proposes that suppliers work with the car companies and each other, to provide insight into best practices that can reduce warranty costs," De Koker added. "The objective of this OESA group is to share best practices that reduce warranty costs for the benefit of the entire industry."

OESA anticipates releasing a publication that outlines a process the automotive value chain should consider to systematically reduce warranty potential during product development. Through this activity, suppliers exchange experiences working with various OEM warranty systems and collectively increase individual company knowledge.

Formed in August 1998, OESA provides a forum for automotive suppliers by addressing issues of common concern through peer group council; serving as a reliable source of information and analysis; and providing an industry voice, when appropriate, on issues of interest. With nearly 400 members having global automotive sales exceeding $300 billion, OESA represents more than 60 percent of North American automotive supplier sales.

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