How Many Cars Can Be Insured on the Same Policy?

Is there a limit to the number of cars that can be insured under the same policy? How many vehicles can you cover under one policy? Today, we’re answering all your questions about multi-car insurance policies – including how to save money on a multi-car insurance policy.

Multi-Car Insurance Is an Easy Way to Save Money

If you live in a household with multiple vehicles, then it’s in your best interest to insure your cars under one policy (unless, of course, your spouse has a DUI or some other major incident that would cause insurance rates to rise).

That’s why multi-vehicle insurance policies exist. Multi-car insurance policies are built for households with two or more passenger vehicles. These vehicles are covered under a single policy. You pay less than you would if you insured each car individually, and you save even more money by bundling vehicle insurance with your home insurance or life insurance.

The benefits of a multi-car insurance policy are obvious. However, there are certain requirements to qualify for a multi-car insurance policy.

Requirements for a Multi-Car Policy

There’s one obvious requirement for qualifying for a multi-car insurance policy: you need to insure two or more passenger vehicles on the same car insurance policy.

To do that, you’ll need all of the usual information – like the VIN and lienholder information (if applicable) for any vehicles, as well as the driver’s license numbers for all drivers. The information required for a multi-car policy is no different from a single-car policy, aside from the fact that you’re listing multiple vehicles.

Is There a Limit to the Number of Vehicles Under One Policy?

Insurance companies almost always have a limit to the number of cars you can cover under a single insurance policy.

Typically, insurers allow you to cover a maximum of four of five vehicles under a single policy.

Other Restrictions with Multi-Car Insurance Policies

There are certain other restrictions you may need to know about with multi-car insurance policies. Some companies offer a discount only if the insured cars are in the same household and insured by related parties. If you’re living with unrelated roommates, for example, then you may not qualify for a multi-car insurance policy.

Other insurers, however, only require everyone to live at the same address, and they don’t care whether or not you’re related.

Another important thing to note is that you could qualify for a multi-car insurance discount in the middle of your term. Some people instinctively wait for the end of their term to add a new vehicle, when they could be taking advantage of the discount immediately.

Does the Coverage for Each Vehicle Need to Be Identical?

This is where things get a little tricky. Typically, insurance companies require all vehicles under a multi-vehicle policy to have the same amount of liability insurance and uninsured motorist coverage. This is done to ensure there’s no confusion regarding how much liability coverage each vehicle has.

In other words, if you have a liability limit of 100/300/50 on your first vehicle, then you need to have those same limits on your second vehicle.

This isn’t just your insurance company being nitpicky: state laws often require liability limits to be the same for all vehicles under a single policy.

Policyholders, however, are free to adjust collision coverage and comprehensive coverage between vehicles. You might want full coverage on your brand new SUV, for example, while getting rid of collision and comprehensive coverage on your 10+-year-old vehicle.

You can also add, remove, or adjust add-ons however you like – including things like rental car reimbursement or custom car coverage. You’re totally free to add this to certain vehicles under your policy but not others.

There’s one important thing to remember with all this: the insurance company insures your vehicle, not the driver. If your primary vehicle has full coverage, but your secondary vehicle has no collision or comprehensive coverage, then that doesn’t change when someone else drives it.

You Can’t Insure Cars and Motorcycles Under the Same Policy

The only other restriction you need to know about is that motorcycles and cars cannot be covered under the same multi-car insurance policy.  Motorcycles require a motorcycle policy – not an auto policy. However, you may still be eligible for a discount by ordering through the same insurer for both policies.

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Connected Cars Create New Security Challenges

Connected cars are essentially computer networks on wheels. The dashboard is now the control center for telecommunications, web surfing, car diagnostics, navigation, and a host of other functions. The rolling computer network monitors the car’s systems using built-in sensors to make sure everything is running properly. A wireless connection can also be used to send telemetry to the telematics service provider or the manufacturer to facilitate service and update software. Once a vehicle is connected to the internet it becomes susceptible to hacking.


Car hacking is the latest in a long series of consumer security threats and has been getting a lot of attention in the news. Major carmakers including BMW, Mercedes-Benz, General Motors, and Tesla have already had to address car hacking threats. Clearly, automotive hacking is posing a safety concern. And as consumers demand more from their connected cars, it will likely mean hacker attacks will target personal data and private information as well.

What Are the Primary Motivators for Hackers?

Hacking has a life cycle like almost everything else in the world. The initial wave of hacking is based on an inherent desire to ‘see what is possible’. This is both the cause of great innovation and the beginning of the opening of a Pandora’s Box. Once something is known to be ‘possible’ there is a natural attraction to the hacker communities, who are seeking some level of self-gain. In the automotive arena, there are currently two or three use cases where a hacker may be motivated to take advantage of vulnerable vehicles. 

We believe these can be summarized into three categories:

  • Phishing Attacks - Hackers take a long-term view of gaining an economic return for their efforts. The point of phishing is to ‘learn something of value’ about a person or a group of people. They are casting a very wide net.

  • One to One Attacks - Let's face it, some people are more interesting than others and hackers are going to go after high-profile opportunities. Sometimes this is just to make a name for themselves and other times it is to target an enemy of their cause.

  • Mass Attacks - What motivates the hacker is to make a big splash and hacking a mass number of vehicles would generate a lot of buzz in the media. We can all imagine the economic impact of waking up one morning and finding that an entire set of vehicles can’t start due to a hacking incident, or worse, that there has been a rash of accidents caused by hackers remotely interfering with cars while they are been driven.

While we think the chances of a major event remain remote at this time, we cannot continue to believe that vehicles are ‘islands’ protected from foreign elements by their disconnected nature.

Manufacturers Need to Be Proactive about Hacking

Over the last year, the high-profile car-hacking events in the news have dramatized the vulnerability of the connected car. 

Using simple wireless communications systems, hackers have demonstrated that no connected car network is safe:

  • BMW was one of the first to report a hacking incident. To dramatize the vulnerability of the new connected cars, the Allgemeiner Deutscher Automobil-Club (ADAC), the German automobile club, was able to reverse-engineer the telematics software that controls BMW’s Connected Drive system, which is installed in more than 2.2 million vehicles. Exploiting security weaknesses in the software, ADAC was able to access the air conditioning system, traffic information system, and the door lock controls using a wireless computer.

  • Chrysler suffered a similar embarrassment when two hackers were able to shut down a Jeep by remote control. In a profile published in Wired magazine, the hackers were able to take control of a Jeep Cherokee traveling at highway speed, first operating the windshield wipers, taking over the radio, and ultimately shutting down the vehicle altogether by locking the transmission.

  • Tesla was also the victim of a cyber attack. Two mobile security experts demonstrated their ability to hack a Tesla Model S at the Dev Con hacker conference in Las Vegas. In order to hack the Tesla, they first had to gain physical access to the vehicle’s network infrastructure to introduce a Trojan. Once the virus was inserted, the hackers were able to convince the car that their laptop was the car’s controller, allowing them to take command, including the ability to shut off the engine.

While all these hacking incidents demonstrate the vulnerability of the connected car, how these carmakers dealt with the problem demonstrated manufacturers’ preparedness to deal with hackers. Chrysler’s approach was the old school ‘sneaker net’ approach, essentially shipping USB drives with a software patch to 1.4 million car owners. BMW’s solution was more elegant; they were able to develop a patch and then send it wirelessly to all affected cars so the software update was automatic. Tesla had the most sophisticated solution. The company already sends regular software updates wirelessly to all its vehicles, so the software patch to fix the security bug was ready for delivery.

What this demonstrates is that with connected car advances, OEMs need to be prepared to address security problems before they occur. Patching faulty software is one thing, but OEMs need proactive security measures to protect vehicles, such as firewalls and data encryption to protect vehicle telematics.

One of the interesting thoughts that arise out of this discussion is what role the consumer should play in security management for their vehicle. In the computing space, consumers play a fairly active role. Will they necessarily play a similar role in the vehicle? Do OEM’s want consumer consent and participation in applying updates?

Personal Security Part of the Connected Car Risk

Security to promote driving safety is a primary consideration. However, manufacturers are also going to have to start thinking about securing personal data as well.

As cars increasingly become an extension of today’s connected lifestyle, car owners will start storing sensitive data in their car systems to handle music downloads, toll payments, and other transactions. Credit card information and identify theft are attractive targets for hackers and something automakers need to consider.

For example, a hacker could set up a wireless sensor to access credit card data stored in cars driving past a given location on the highway. Hackers wouldn’t even have to go looking for targets; the data drives right past their door. Or what about hacking navigational data? If you can match a car’s GPS location to a known home address, then a housebreaker can tell when you are away from home.

To address these security concerns, Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) have introduced the Security and Privacy in Your Car Act, also known as the SPY Car Act. The legislation would establish a rating system for consumers to rank how well cars protect security and privacy. The senators’ proposal also asks the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to establish new standard of protection. These standards would require OEMs isolate software systems and take steps to secure connected vehicles. They also want to require technology that would detect, record, and stop hacking attempts in real time.

Smart OEMs are becoming proactively involved in connected car security. By being proactive and taking positive steps today, manufacturers can become part of the security solution and help shape industry standards and legislation. They also can be ready to reassure customers that the next generation of connected cars is safe and secure.

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How To Save Money On Car Insurance

Are you a driver under age 25? Are you the parent of a new driver? Then buckle up, because you’re about to head uphill with your car insurance rates. While it’s true that auto insurance rates are higher with a young driver on the policy, there are a few secrets to keeping those rates as low as possible. Follow our survival guide to car insurance so that buying a policy for the first time or adding a teen to your existing policy won’t be so scary after all.

Understand That Your Rates Will Increase

Teens and young adults are considered to be “inexperienced drivers” by insurance agencies until they turn 25 years old. And because agencies are assuming more risk with an inexperienced driver, they charge more to have that driver on the policy.

If you’re a parent, it’s hard to say just how much your insurance will increase with a teen driver because so much of it depends on individual circumstances. According to an Allstate agent who spoke with Aceable, for some people, adding a teen to their insurance only increases it by a few hundred dollars, while for others, the cost of the policy can triple. Meanwhile, if you’re under age 25 and buying car insurance for yourself, the price is almost guaranteed to be higher than it would be for someone older. That’s why it’s crucial to compare policies and find out which agency will give you the best discount. 

Know When To Add Your Teen To Your Policy

It’s tricky to know when to add your teen to your insurance policy because it differs by state as well as agency. For the most part, however, you won’t need to list your teen as a driver on your policy until they get their license. It’s a good idea, though, to notify your insurance agency as soon as your teen gets a learner permit. This way, in the event of an accident, you’ll know if they’re covered by your policy.

Consider Switching Insurance Agenics

Adding a new driver to the family brings about many exciting changes. (Less carpool duty for you, hopefully.) During this time of change, you might also consider changing insurance agencies to better suit your needs. Your current agency might not be the most affordable option, and in fact, it might actively be using pricing to get rid of you! Even if you’ve been with the same insurance company for years, now might be the perfect time to shop around.

Use An Aggregator To Shop And Compare Plans

An online aggregator for insurance companies is the fastest, easiest way to compare policies. There are several available to you.

Look For Extra Discounts

With a young driver on an insurance policy, you’ll want to scrounge up any discounts that you can. Check with your insurance agent for discounts related to: taking a defensive driving course, making good grades, driving a fuel-efficient car and more. 

Feeling a little more sure of yourself when it comes to car insurance? Good. Trust us: This process is way less scary than you think. And if you do need help, remember that Aceable is here for you every step of the way!

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Refinancing your auto loan

Whether you can’t manage the monthly payments or your credit has improved, there are plenty of reasons to consider a refinance. While there are different motivations for replacing your current loan, it is important to understand the outcomes of an auto refinance. Here are some of the benefits that could help you save.

Lower your monthly payments

If you are struggling to make your monthly payments, you may consider a refinance. A refi can increase the term of your loan, giving you more time to pay off the note. This extension can help you better manage other monthly expenses by lowering your car payments.

Reduce the length of your loan

Some borrowers look to shorten their loan term to help pay off the vehicle faster. While this increases your monthly payment, it can decrease the overall interest you pay which saves you money down the line.

Decrease your interest rate

If your credit score has improved since you purchased your vehicle, it might be time to shop around for a new interest rate. A lower rate can reduce your total interest charge which can help you pay off the vehicle faster. A good rule of thumb is to seek rates in the low single digits.

Let the Travis Credit Union be your resource for buying or refinancing your vehicle. We offer great low rates for auto loan purchases or refinancing. We also offer quick loan processing, an easy online loan application, and other great options when financing your auto loan. Visit Livauto.com/autorefinance to learn how you can start saving today.

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Auto Warranty Scam Warning



It has been reported that a variety of companies and marketing firms have been making unsolicited calls to offer customers an automotive extended warranty. When a customer is told that the warranty is about to expire, if they are not educated to the warranty business or their vehicles coverage may sometimes believe anything a telemarketing agent says. Unfortunately in almost every case they are creating this information out of thin air with hope that they can scare or pressure a customer into purchasing warranty coverage for their vehicle. This is obviously a dishonest practice but is borderline illegal as well.

It is also been reported that a variety of third-party companies have been sending a postcard a flyer in the mail with the same general information hoping to coax a customer into calling them so they can attempt to sell them warranty coverage. This process is a high-pressure process, usually involving several levels of sales professionals to try and close the deal.

What these companies never tell you is that in many cases, your car may still be covered by an existing warranty as they have no knowledge of the vehicle’s actual existing warranty status.

Also, there are many levels of warranty coverage that are available that are generally not explained in clear detail to a customer. They simply sign you up, collect your money, and then send you documentation later where you find out there are many loopholes that would allow a claim to be denied. This is assuming the company even has a claims department and any legitimacy at all.

In most cases, you may have simply given money for a product that either doesn’t exist or is not an actual insurance company product.

If the company does have any legitimacy, not having an underwriter simply means that in the event that they have any type of claims activity at all, they can easily be wiped out as they very rarely leave much money in a claims fund to protect the consumer.

The bottom line is a customer’s best option is to reach out to a legitimate warranty provider that is directly underwritten by a US-based, “A” rated carrier. The other option of course is to visit a local dealership and find out what they are offering. The downside to this is that dealerships are generally 50-100% more expensive the same level of coverage you can get in the automotive warranty aftermarket.

The bottom line is you will almost never hear a radio ad or receive a notice by mail from any legitimate warranty company so buyer beware!

If you are looking for warranty coverage a great place to start would be www.livauto.com where you can get wholesale pricing for the industry’s highest level of coverage.

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NOW TRENDING: 48-VOLT ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS


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The auto industry is in the middle of a revolution, one where new and emerging technologies are steering the market. Such high-tech features are placing a tremendous burden on the typical vehicle’s 12-volt electrical systems and for this reason we’re seeing a new trend: cars equipped with 48-volt electrical systems. Not every new vehicle will feature such systems, but for those that do, there are strong benefits for manufacturers, consumers and the environment alike.

The Current Standard: 12-Volt Electrical Systems

Every vehicle’s electrical system is composed of a battery, starter and an alternator. Modern vehicles have 12-volt electrical systems, with the car battery serving as the center of that system.

Electricity flows out from the battery by means of the positive terminal through wires to power various components, including the starter. The starter stores a small amount of electricity to turn the engine, while the alternator helps keep the battery charged when the vehicle is running, by sending power back to the battery through the negative terminal.

Although 12-volt electrical systems have been the standard for decades, they’ve also been called upon to do more work in recent years, including powering water pumps and turbochargers, and to supply power to the computer, navigation and audio systems. As vehicles become more complex, manufacturers are exploring other options, including the 48-volt electrical systems.

Emerging Technology: 48-Volt Electrical Systems

There are two reasons why car manufacturers are planning for 48-volt electrical systems:

1) Such systems can handle more complex loads, including technologies related to autonomous vehicles.

2) Environmental benefits may be realized, through reduced emissions and improved fuel economy.

Suppliers such as Bosch, Continental, Delphi and Valeo are developing 48-volt electrical systems for manufacturers. These new systems will power such energy-intensive components as turbochargers, hybrid motors and stop-start motors, and supply electric power to the water pump, air conditioning, power steering and power brakes.

Does this spell the end of the 12-volt electrical system? No. In fact, future cars will likely run the two systems concurrently, with 12-volt systems powering the lights, center console, seats and windows, and 48-volt systems tasked with supplying energy for power-consuming components.

On the environmental side, 48-volt electrical systems will also allow manufacturers to transform some models into mild hybrids by replacing the starter with a 48-volt motor generator unit (MGU). Such vehicles would also gain a 48-volt lithium-ion battery pack and a DC-to-DC converter, creating the mild hybrid system.

A mild hybrid system utilizes both the gasoline engine and electric motor to power the car, with fuel savings of 15 to 20 percent possible. Like similar systems, mild hybrids offer another tangible environmental benefit: a reduction in emissions. In all, mild hybrids provide about two-thirds the benefit of traditional hybrids, but at just one-third the cost. Expect manufacturers to turn to such systems in an effort to meet ever-increasing federal fuel economy and emissions mandates.

Current Applications

You’ll currently find 48-volt electrical systems in a few models, including the Bentley Bentayga, which utilizes this system to power its electronic sway bars. While mechanically operated sway bars do a good job of reducing body roll in a turn, the electronic system is simply superior. That’s expected in a $230,000 super luxury SUV, but it’s only achieved with a 48-volt system.

 

Coming to a Car Near You

Most manufacturers haven’t said how and when they’ll implement 48-volt electrical systems, but you’ll be hearing about them, especially if you follow the major auto show and technology circuits.

For North American enthusiasts, upcoming auto shows in Los Angeles, Detroit, and New York may very well reveal where this trend is going regionally. The CES (Consumer Electronics and Technology) Show held in Las Vegas in early January should also provide some details.

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WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO BUY A CAR?



The best time to buy a new car might simply be when you need it most. But if your purchase is not urgent and maximizing savings is your goal, there are some dates on the calendar it certainly helps to know about.

The following are all smart times to visit the dealership and shop for a deal.

Late in the month

The last week and particularly the last weekend of the month are often when a dealership’s staff needs to sell the final cars that enable them to meet their sales goals. They may more willing to negotiate on the price of a vehicle as a result.

End of the model year

Late summer, around Labor Day, is when most new-model-year cars start to reach dealership lots. With dealers keen to free up space for them, it’s a great time to shop for discounted current-model-year vehicles. While Labor Day sales events were an early opportunity to check out such offers, dealers will be aiming to move outgoing models throughout the fall.

Black Friday

The car-buying stars align the day after Thanksgiving. There are deep discounts to be had from automakers on the outgoing models, dealerships may offer their own reductions, the holiday weekend falls at the end of the month, and a huge marketing buzz now surrounds the whole event. Many carmakers use Thanksgiving to kick off holiday season sales that run until the end of the year.

End of the calendar year

With both manufacturers and dealers looking to finish the year on a high, this is one of the best times to find a deal, particularly on “leftover” outgoing-model-year vehicles. December has the highest discount on the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, at 6.1 percent on average, and the highest incentives in the year, according to Edmunds.

Early in the week

Weekends are understandably busy times for dealerships, so timing a visit early in the week, on a Monday or Tuesday, when they are quieter and demand is lower, may help you get a vehicle at a good price.

Get a step ahead with preapproved financing

When the time is right for you to purchase a car, Road Loans may be able to streamline your process. You can apply for financing by completing our online application in just minutes and receive an instant loan decision.

With preapproval, RoadLoans customers are able to walk into the dealership with the confidence of a cash buyer, already knowing exactly how much they have to spend on a vehicle, and negotiate a great deal.

Just download and print your loan packet and visit your recommended dealership to shop for your next car, truck or SUV the same day. We work with a national network of auto dealerships that are able to show our customers select, high quality new and used vehicles.

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